About your Search

20120926
20121004
Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)
together, civil society, i.e., ngos, ie, education, et cetera, bring them together with business, bring them together with government, both at the national or and at the sub national level and really collaborate intensely to come to a solution. >> rose: we continue this evening with matt damon and gary white, theyre cofounders of water.org. >> and i heard these statistics that were jaw dropping about a child dying every 20 seconds because of lack of access to clean water and sanitation, that is, that to me is just staggering, because -- because to relate to that as an american, i mean, we don't know people who are thirsty, it just doesn't happen, right? you know, with away don't know kid who die from diarrhea. >> rose: water is ubiquitous. >> yes, of course, or cholera for that matter, just clean water. so, you know, so that was one side of it, just the mindless death and bono talks about stupid death, you know, because it is preventable. >> we have known how to make water safe for more than 100 years, right? imagine we discovered the cure for aids today, and 100 years from now
not wedded to mr. qaddafi or to mr. -- he was not educated in the russian federation, he was educate in europe. his friends were in western europe, not in russia. and when people say that you are protecting president assad, this is absolute ignorance of the real situation. >> rose: i believe you're protecting him, and why am i ignorant if -- >> wait charley, tell me in what way i was protecting him. >> rose: in several ways. most people believe that if they did not have russian support and iranian support, he would not last very long. both in terms of arms and in the iranian case, some suggest more than that. without iranian support and russian support, most people believe that president assad would be out of syria in a shorter time than otherwise he might last. >> that's the power of the media. the media covering the hearing crises, in most creases, and politicians by the way when they address the public through the media, thinking, i believe, not only about the fure of syria but also the domestic political positioning, they speak in very straightforward and simple, if not to say
of battalion and above. so basically we continue the strategy to train and educate afghan security forces. there's no train-- attempt at strategy. >> rose: when the french going out? >> well, some of them have left already. some of the combat troops. but i have to add the french stay committed. they continue to contribute in different ways. among other things they contribute trainers to our training mission in afghanistan. >> rose: but combat soldiers will be leaving by the end of 2013? >> actually by the end of this year. so they are in the process now of withdrawing but they still contribute trainers to our training mission in afghanistan so they stay committed until the end of 2014. >> rose: it's a presence but not a combat presence then. >> the same goes for the coalition partners. we have different tasks within and some people contribute trainers, others contribute combat troops. >> rose: okay. at the beginning of 2014 how many nations will do you think will be contributing combat troops? >> we don't know yet because that will very much depend on the security situation on the ground.
are welcomed in that respect. >> rose: some people be you have been part of her education. >> um... plaimaybe the combination that s place in changes-- exchanges between a person who started physics,ike mrs. merkel d the modest economies may be productive. >> rose: one of the things you pointed out to me this summer which i particularly found fascinating, there's also culture here, the culture of individual nations. >> it's almost only culture. >> rose: meaning? >> meaning that-- i mean, culture is how people behave, what-- for example, anglo-saxons, the u.k., the u.s., tend to see a bigger role for economic activities in the sense of aggressive management of demand through budgetary aggressiveness, if needed monetary policy. not so the germans, the germans are more linked to the notion-- i sometimes say for gem ans it is-- they see growth as something flowing to the benefit of those who practice virtue. virtue for a household is to engage in a lot of savings, being moderate in consumption, for a government is not to run a deficit. for a country, virtue is to have your balance of payments, i
, and it is about efficiency. >> and market education? >> it can be, look for example, in retrospect, it is obvious, the banks need a higher capital assets. >> right. >> that requires regulation. >> and higher capital requirements? >> ye they did. and the systemic risks were far too buying and you need to regulate properly to do that and in the uk we are trying to get a greater separation between the retail side of banking and the investment side of banking. so look, the lesson of 2008, market reform is essential, under regulated markets have a tendency to crash. but let's not think that somehow that means that an old-fashioned state is going to be the answer. i mean, let's give you an example which may be to american eyes is challenging. we have a national health service. >> right. which. >> had one for a while. >> >> tax funded, universal service for all britains use it. we know we need to reform that, we need to reform it so that we get much greater responsibility of citizens as well as clinicians because we know that in diabetes or asthma self management -- >> what is wrong with it in is it th
Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)